War and Pollution

In addition to the fact that alternative energy does not scale to meet existing electrical demand, the components used in manufacturing solar panels are highly toxic, and become hazardous waste when these panels wear out. Meanwhile, mining and manufacture of these panels overseas is already creating environmental and social disasters for rural indigenous peoples.

Stopping fossil fuel export, as recommended by the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, would help to protect the Salish Sea, and to preserve these fuels for the future energy needs of Canadians and Americans. The real challenge for the future, however, is for industrially advanced societies to use less energy.

Conservation in heating and lighting is part of that reduction, but the major part is reducing consumption of petroleum-based products, i.e. plastic, jet fuel and gasoline.

Since the U.S. military is an enormous consumer of petroleum, curbing wars of aggression to secure access to foreign minerals used in generating so-called clean energy, i.e. gold, copper, lithium and uranium used for solar and nuclear power, would make a huge dent in the US/NATO carbon footprint.

The American way of life–that consumes vast quantities of minerals for electricity and electronics, car and jet travel at the expense of the rest of the world–demands both endless war and increasing pollution. Reducing demand is not a popular position to promote, but it is the only effective one.