Givers and Takers

My piece de resistance — Netwar at Cherry Point — turns one on April 1st.

This case study about the dark side of white power on the Salish Sea focuses on fossil fuel export versus indigenous peoples, or perhaps better stated — Wall Street versus human rights.

For some, the beloved San Juan Islands beckon as paradise in a world of total chaos. For Warren Buffett, BP and other major energy investors, they are collateral damage in the pursuit of oil portfolio profits.

Advertisements

Bellow Travelers

British Petroleum Cherry Point refinery and friends are presently promoting a “preserve cherry point jobs” campaign to mislead Whatcom county voters into thinking that stopping fossil fuel export will harm local jobs and taxes that support schools. The truth is that the property taxes paid by BP and Phillips 66 remain the same with or without export, as do the refining jobs to meet domestic demand for gasoline and aviation fuel.

The tourism industry of the San Juan Islands is huge, but we mustn’t forget the Dungeness crab commercial fishery at Cherry Point and Georgia Strait that supports families in Anacortes, Blaine, and on the Lummi Indian Reservation. The seafood processors in Blaine are some of the last jobs available in a community that once canned more salmon than anywhere else in the region.

Here’s a child-friendly slide show about how to preserve jobs without “more toxic fuels” polluting the “sacred waters of the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve.”

Industry-Funded Indians

350 and IEN, both of whom are funded by Dakota Access Pipeline investor Warren Buffett, issued a joint statement on DAPL February 7. Tides Foundation, a money laundry for tar sands investors and oil industry magnates such as Buffett, is used to corrupt NGOs such as 350 and Indigenous Environmental Network. While they are allowed to oppose pipelines in order to maintain credibility as so-called “water protectors,” they are noted for maintaining silence about their benefactor’s investments in pipelines and bomb trains.