Breaking Free Discord

Breaking Free

A Catalyst for Interracial Discord

By Jay Taber

 

In Cherry Point to March Point: Deriving an Estimate of the Situation, I observed that corporate funding for organized anti-Indian racism–promoted by Tea Party leaders in the Pacific Northwest–is augmented by the phony, corporate-sponsored, fossil-free activism, devised by public relations people working on behalf of Wall Street. The likely public backlash against this misguided activism–by the Wall Street-funded NGO 350–I argued, provides fuel for the Tea Party to elicit assistance from anti-Indian organizations like CERA, as well as to commission revenge by vigilantes like the Christian Patriot militias toward tribes opposing fossil fuel export.

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) have conducted themselves admirably in the fossil fuel export war. Associating themselves, in any way, with the 350 Break Free campaign could easily undo the public good will they have painstakingly built over the last few years.

In Taking on Organized Racism in the Pacific Northwest: The Challenge of Leadership, I noted that anti-Indian organizations–twenty years ago–challenged ATNI and human rights organizers to prevent bloodshed by Christian Patriot militias in the greater Seattle region. Today, with CERA and the Tea Party actively trying to recreate a climate of fear over American Indian treaty rights—that are impeding fossil fuel export plans–the potential for violence and malicious harassment can only be thwarted by the intervention of civic leaders and moral authorities. To date, that has not happened. With a few notable exceptions, the media has been no help at all.

 

[Jay Thomas Taber is an associate scholar of the Center for World Indigenous Studies and a contributing editor of Fourth World Journal. Since 1994, he has served as communications director at Public Good Project, a volunteer network of researchers, analysts and journalists defending democracy. As a consultant, he has assisted Indigenous peoples in the European Court of Human Rights and at the United Nations.]

Breaking Free Corruption

Breaking Free

The Corruption of Alternative Media

By Jay Taber

Break Free, the 350 ‘clean energy’ Ponzi scheme–funded by Warren Buffett–relies on three sociological aspects to succeed:

The 350 ‘clean energy’ campaigns count on these aspects, as well as widespread ignorance promoted by corrupt alternative media. Social engineering through social media is accomplished through hush money, distributed to popular non-profits, in order to create a fixed mentality.

This, in turn, creates a world of make believe, in support of architects of the final solution. On-the-take of handouts from the financial elite, the collaborators with the axis of evil make it all possible. Greenwashing Wall Street is a big part of that.

Corruption of alternative media such as Democracy Now!, Grist and The Real News Network (TRNN) is achieved through foundation grants distributed by the financial elite, such as Warren Buffett’s NOVO Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, TIDES Foundation, and Ford Foundation. Ford funds Democracy Now!, Grist and TRNN, and is a promoter of REDD and other Wall Street-backed carbon market schemes–now part of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, that include nuclear power development.

350–funded by Buffett via NOVO and TIDES, as well as by Rockefeller Bros.–has enabled Buffett and the financial elite, i.e. Bill Gates, to profit handsomely from these 350 ‘clean energy’ campaigns (Break Free is just getting started):

  1. KXL
  2. Divestment
  3. Break Free

Break Free, promoting a transition to fossil free living, is the groundwork being laid to bolster such scams as the Solutionary Rail plan–a boondoggle to harvest enormous public monies through an electrified rail corridor project from Chicago to Seattle. This boondoggle would benefit not only Buffett, but the nuclear power industry–promoted heavily by Bill Gates at COP21 under the guise of the New Economy, and evangelized by Bill McKibben of 350.

350, and its affiliate Rising Tide, are noted extensively in the Break Free campaign news at outlets like Democracy Now! (funded by TIDES). The Cascadia Weekly (CW), which covers the Pacific Northwest region incorporating the March Point Shell and Tesoro oil refineries at Anacortes, Washington State–location of a 350 Break Free disobedience camp out on BNSF Railway tracks–in its May 25 issue, reprinted Democracy Now! hype of Break Free propaganda posing as news.

In the May 25 issue, CW editor Tim Johnson took the opportunity to insert an editor’s reply, dissing a letter to the editor (see pg. 5) writer for calling out the Break Free hypocrisy. In March 2014, after taking advertising PR money from Gateway Pacific Terminal (GPT)–a proposed coal export development of SSA Marine and BNSF Railway–Mr. Johnson attacked Citizen Journalist Sandra Robson for exposing anti-Indian racism funded by the coal export consortium that included BNSF, owned by Warren Buffett. Her expose resulted in a libel threat by GPT spokesman Craig Cole.

As I noted in Hijacking the Environmental Movement: Just Say No to 350, ‘350 began its dark career betraying the G77 at COP15 in 2009, and continued its shady dealings by sabotaging the 2010 Indigenous peoples’ climate conference in Bolivia’. Now, 350 is promoting ineffective ‘civil disobedience’ as a means of diverting environmental activists from reality-based social change, and as a means of laying the groundwork for yet another Buffet-Gates empire, like they did with the KXL campaign and the designer protests and vanity arrests that made oil train magnates Buffett and Gates a bundle.

The corruption of alternative media and the non-profit industrial complex by Wall Street is one of the most insidious examples of Netwar (networked psychological warfare) in history. Indeed, the creation of discursive monoculture portends the death of democracy. Editors and publishers who choose to sell their souls to Wall Street deserve to be publicly humiliated.

[Jay Thomas Taber is an associate scholar of the Center for World Indigenous Studies and a contributing editor of Fourth World Journal. Since 1994, he has served as communications director at Public Good Project, a volunteer network of researchers, analysts and journalists defending democracy. As a consultant, he has assisted Indigenous peoples in the European Court of Human Rights and at the United Nations.]

Taking on Organized Racism

Taking on Organized Racism in the Pacific Northwest

The Challenge of Leadership

By Jay Taber

 

Like twenty years ago–when organized racism tore Pacific Northwest communities apart–what is required today is an organized community response, one that uses research as an organizing tool. For three years, Sandra Robson has documented the people and methods behind industrial-sponsored terrorism; now it’s time to put that information to good use. The only thing missing is leadership capable of organizing concerned citizens in mounting an effective opposition to racism sponsored by SSA marine, BNSF Railway, KGMI Radio, Citizens Equal Rights Alliance (CERA), Northwest Jobs Alliance, and the Whatcom Tea Party.

Organized racism by organized labor — in cahoots with the Tea Party and major corporations — is something that ought to concern local and regional human rights organizations. Indeed, this concern compelled me and others to publish articles, commentary and special reports over the last three years. As an associate scholar of the Olympia-based Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS)— the publisher of IC Magazine — I have alerted the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) regarding the ongoing industrial-sponsored racism, targeting them and Lummi Nation for opposing fossil fuel export on the Salish Sea.

As a think tank established by leaders of the National Congress of American Indians in the US and the Assembly of First Nations in Canada, CWIS in 1996 hosted a conference along with ATNI and the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission titled The Politics of Land and Bigotry, to “join public policy activists and representatives of Indian nations in a dialogue about the portentous movements in America intent on promoting interracial discord.” Twenty years later, this topic is once again apropos.

The Whatcom Human Rights award–presented in the past to people such as Bellingham Herald crime reporter Cathy Logg, Public Good Project research director Paul de Armond, and Pacific Northwest human rights organizer Bill Wassmuth (all now deceased)—is a form of acknowledgment missing today. Citizen Journalist Sandra Robson stands in that company, as do others involved in the Salish Sea fossil fuel export war.

At the initial 1997 awards banquet held by the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force–now defunct–I sat alongside the editor of the Every Other Weekly (now Cascadia Weekly), Tim Johnson, whom I introduced to Cathy. Cathy, although working for the infamous Herald, courageously covered the Christian Patriot militias running wild in Western Washington. Paul de Armond put his life on the line helping to apprehend Christian Patriots in Seattle and Whatcom County, who were making explosives to kill human rights activists. Bill Wassmuth—a former Catholic priest–took on Aryan Nations, which attempted to murder him by blowing the back of his home off with dynamite.

As I look around today, civic leaders and moral authorities mostly decline to accept the challenge of leadership in social conflict involving organized racism. Mainstream and alternative media alike avoid it like the plague.

What this does is allow it to grow, until, like viruses, it becomes a public health crisis. As in epidemiology, ignorance, laziness, and cowardice do not produce beneficial results.

[Jay Thomas Taber is an associate scholar of the Center for World Indigenous Studies and a contributing editor of Fourth World Journal. Since 1994, he has served as communications director at Public Good Project, a volunteer network of researchers, analysts and journalists defending democracy. As a consultant, he has assisted Indigenous peoples in the European Court of Human Rights and at the United Nations.]

Making Things Work

Looking back on the ways Salish Sea residents have guarded this marine estuary since the first Earth Day in 1970, a few individuals and organizations stand out: Warren G. Magnuson, John Spellman, Washington Environmental Council, League of Women Voters, and the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians.

As U.S. Senator, Magnuson made it federal law that oil tankers entering the Salish Sea had to have double hulls and tug escorts. As Washington Governor, Spellman stood his ground against the oil companies that wanted to build a pipeline across the sea from the Olympic Peninsula to the mainland.

Washington Environmental Council has intervened many times using pro bono attorneys to stop ludicrous proposals, such as dredging the most prolific Dungeness crab nursery in the state at Cherry Point to build oil drilling platforms. League of Women Voters challenged corrupt government practices that threatened the environment and the democratic process on numerous occasions, and the first nations that comprise the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians have successfully guarded their treaty rights to a healthy environment so many times that it is difficult to count.

Less newsworthy but noteworthy efforts by ordinary citizens on a daily basis have helped to provide healthier choices for the public to live a lifestyle that respects the environment, securing public transit systems, bicycle lanes, car pools, as well as subsidies for home insulation and LED lighting.

All the above are constructive uses of time and energy to protect the environment of the Salish Sea. Young people–inundated by 350 propaganda, calling on them to put their energy into designer protests and vanity arrests that achieve nothing other than exhausting law enforcement budgets–should take note.

Cherry Point to March Point

Cherry Point to March Point

Deriving an Estimate of the Situation

By Jay Taber

As volunteer researchers, analysts and journalists at Public Good Project for twenty years, three of the questions we always ask when deriving an estimate of the situation regarding social conflict are these:

  1. What are the likely consequences of strategies attempting to change society?
  2. Are they likely to be effective in achieving the stated goals, or are they bound to fail?
  3. Are they likely to make things better, or possibly worse?

In attempting to answer these questions, we ask the questions used by reporters and editors:

  • Who are these guys?
  • What’s the deal?
  • When did this all start?
  • Where did they come from?
  • Why are they doing this?

In the Pacific Northwest fossil fuel export war, I published a report about corporate-sponsored racism, Netwar at Cherry Point: White Power on the Salish Sea. In that report, I exposed corporate funding for organized racism promoted by Whatcom Tea Party leaders, Citizens Equal Rights Alliance (CERA) members, and KGMI Radio hosts.

As a result of the success of Lummi Nation in prevailing over SSA Marine and BNSF Railway in the conflict at Cherry Point—which I noted in Lummi Nation Wins Opening Battle—Pacific Northwest tribes demonstrated how persistence, community outreach, and effective legal strategy could defeat some of America’s largest corporations. In doing so, they won the respect of the public, as well as mainstream media. No small achievement.

Soon after this victory, however, Lummi and other Coast Salish tribal members–apparently seduced by the ‘clean energy’ chimera–supported the 350-sponsored Break Free campaign, dramatized at the March Point oil refineries. In this choreographed enactment of moral theatrics, 350 followers camped two nights in the middle of railroad tracks, until removed and arrested by state and local police.

Answering the questions noted above, in my article Breaking Free: A New Age Ghost Dance, I observed that, like the 350 KXL and Divestment campaigns, the Break Free campaign is a fraud devised by public relations people working on behalf of Wall Street. As a fossil fuel industry-funded Trojan horse, I said, 350 is misleading these activists into committing excessive and misguided behavior–by definition, fanatic.

My assessment of the situation, in which 350 stated publicly that their intent is to shut down oil refineries–thus putting six million oil industry workers on unemployment, and depriving the public of the means to drive to work, heat their homes, and have electricity–is that this is a strategy that is bound to fail. What’s more, this is a public relations strategy that is likely to engender a public backlash–thus potentially squandering the public good will, painstakingly built by the tribes since 2011.

My conclusion is that the activists mobilized by 350 are overreacting to the crisis of climate change. There are more effective means of addressing it, means that do not alienate the public. In my opinion, the tribes need to disassociate from the 350 reckless showboats ASAP. We have enough to do without having a CERA/militia uprising in the Pacific Northwest again. The Tea Party is no doubt chomping at the bit over Cherry Point & March Point. No need to provide them with the fuel to recruit racist vigilantes.

The tribes have conducted themselves admirably; it would be a huge mistake for them to endorse the recklessness of 350. The misguided activists claim that they are on a holy mission, unconstrained by social conventions. They perceive that the climate crisis is the same as the Civil Rights or Vietnam War crises. It is not. America can survive without segregation and war; it cannot survive without fossil fuel.

As noted by Ozzie Zehner, author of Green Illusions, generating alternative energy–using solar cells–requires the fossil-fueled extraction of minerals and the fossil-fueled manufacture of solar panels, that are made using rare earth minerals, and that produce highly toxic materials. Alternative energy or ‘clean energy’ from solar cells not only cannot technologically displace fossil fuel in meeting current electrical demand; it does not even reduce CO2.

To make matters worse, the toxic greenhouse gas emissions from the manufacture and disposal of solar cells are 10,000-25,000 times more potent than the CO2 emissions generated from burning fossil fuel.

350 instigated this end-to-fossil-fuels nonsense, and is fanning the flames. They need to be held accountable for that.

 

[Jay Thomas Taber is an associate scholar of the Center for World Indigenous Studies and a contributing editor of Fourth World Journal. Since 1994, he has served as communications director at Public Good Project, a volunteer network of researchers, analysts and journalists defending democracy. As a consultant, he has assisted Indigenous peoples in the European Court of Human Rights and at the United Nations.]

Unjust Transition

Break Free thinks that by appropriating the just transition idea–that the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers union proposed in the 1990s to protect the livelihoods of its members–they can persuade the public that the 350 ‘disobedience’ campaign camp out at the March Point oil refineries May 14-16, 2016 was a pro-labor noble cause. That is a lie.

The Break Free moral theatrics camp out–that cost Skagit County $100,000 for law enforcement overtime–stated in advance that they intended to close down the refineries and refinery jobs, causing workers to go on unemployment. Instead of building an alliance with oil industry workers–terrified of bomb trains exploding as they unload at refineries–these privileged youth want to cost them their jobs.

The blatantly obvious platitudes of 350 groupies, and their arrogance as mindless followers of Break Free, apparently knows no bounds. I mean, the Break Free just transition agenda is staggering in its ignorance. Suggesting that six million US fossil fuel industry workers can collect unemployment, instead of paychecks, is preposterous. They’d become destitute, all so these imbeciles can take selfies posturing as climate heroes.

If Break Free had any brains, they would put their energy into organizing against bomb trains in collaboration with refinery workers, possibly organizing a union strike against these deadly forms of oil shipment. Had they done that, Skagit County residents–afraid for their families’ safety–might stand with them. Now, Break Free and 350 are known for being reckless and uncaring.

This is not surprising, as 350 has been reckless and uncaring since its inception, when it got in bed with Warren Buffett, TIDES foundation, and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Their sabotage of the 2010 indigenous peoples climate conference in Bolivia–on behalf of their oil industry funders–made the name 350 synonymous with ‘agent saboteur‘.
Further reading

[Jay Thomas Taber is an associate scholar of the Center for World Indigenous Studies and a contributing editor of Fourth World Journal. Since 1994, he has served as communications director at Public Good Project, a volunteer network of researchers, analysts and journalists defending democracy. As a consultant, he has assisted Indigenous peoples in the European Court of Human Rights and at the United Nations.]